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10 Foods That Are High in Vitamin C

10 Foods That Are High in Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a water-soluble nutrient that is a crucial part of your health1. Don’t assume vitamin C benefits your immune system alone, it can do much more than that.

Vitamin C has been shown to provide many health benefits, including reducing blood pressure levels2, increasing antioxidant levels3, reducing the risk of heart disease4, improving iron absorption5, protecting against gout, reducing the risk of dementia and boosting the immune system.

The nutrient also protects you from heart disease. If you’re having issues with an iron deficiency, vitamin C can help. By improving your iron absorption, the vitamin allows you to have higher iron levels without taking supplements. You get more from what you eat.

Issues like high cholesterol and cancer are also affected by vitamin C. Typically, the nutrient decreases levels of bad cholesterol. It also fights off cancer by fighting free radicals, one of the common causes of cancer.

Finally, there’s the one superpower that helped vitamin C gain popularity. Vitamin C can impact your immune system. However, it might not help in the way you would imagine. Recent research shows that vitamin C isn’t particularly effective at preventing colds. Instead, it lessens the length and the symptoms of your cold.

10 Foods That Are High in Vitamin C

1. Oranges: One 8-ounce glass of orange juice contains 124 milligrams of vitamin C, so it only takes one serving to get a day's worth of vitamin C.

2. Grapefruit: It's no surprise that grapefruits are also high in vitamin C. One-half of a grapefruit has 45 milligrams of vitamin C, plus fiber, potassium, and plenty of vitamin A.

3. Green Peppers: One medium-sized green bell pepper has 95 milligrams of vitamin C, which is enough for one full day.

4. Red Sweet Peppers: Red sweet peppers are high in vitamin C and have a milder flavor than their greener companions. One cup of raw red sweet pepper delivers 384 percent of your daily vitamin C requirement with only 37 calories.

5. Strawberries: Strawberries are sweet, juicy, and loaded with vitamin C. One cup of strawberry slices had 98 milligrams.

6. Broccoli: One cup raw chopped broccoli has 81 mg vitamin C. That's not that high, but a giant serving of raw broccoli provides most of the vitamin C you'll need for one day.

7. Kiwi: Kiwis are an excellent source of vitamin C. One small fruit has more than 60 milligrams.

8. Brussels Sprouts: Brussels sprouts are rich in vitamin C. Even after being cooked, one cup yields 160 percent of your daily value of C.

9. Cooked Cabbage: Raw cabbage can add some vitamin C to your daily intake, but cooked cabbage has even more. Although cooking reduces the amount of vitamin C in any food, it also reduces the volume, so you'll consume more vitamin C per cup of cooked cabbage.

10. Acerola Cherries: The acerola cherry is one of the fruits that contains over 150 phytonutrients. Also, it has one of the highest vitamin C content. As much as 4 percent of the cherry’s weight is ascorbic acid. This roughly translates to around more than 1,600 mg of vitamin C per 100 grams of raw acerola. And unlike other foods with vitamin C, this superfood is different because it has the complete vitamin C complex.

The body does not make Vitamin C or store it for later use. Eating fresh citrus fruits, peppers, and broccoli can deliver your body vitamin C, but it is recommended that you take a whole food vitamin C supplement. NATURELO’s Vitamin C supplement with organic acerola cherry and citrus bioflavonoids is 100% natural and comes from real fruits.

References: 1. National Institue Of Health: Vitamin C 2. Vitamin C lowers blood pressure and alters vascular responsiveness in salt-induced hypertension, 2002 Dec;80(12):1199-202 3. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress before and after Vitamin C Supplementation, March 1997 4. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk: a pooled analysis of 9 cohorts, 2004 Dec;80(6):1508-20 5. Iron bioavailability and dietary reference values, 2010 May;91(5):1461S-1467S. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.28674F. Epub 2010 Mar 3.